Easter Sunday book: Sadhana is not for daydreamers

Many New Age books encourage a lot of excitement and very little meditation.

Sadhana is a relatively difficult book, because it has passages like this:

And here’s something encouraging for you: The fact that you
were aware of your mental wanderings or of your inner turmoil or
of your inability to be still shows that you have some small degree
of silence within you, at least a sufficient amount of silence to be
aware of all of this.
Close your eyes again and become aware of your wandering
mind . . . for just two minutes . . .
Now sense the silence that makes it possible for you to be
aware of the wanderings of your mind . . .
It is this minimal silence that you have within you that we shall
build on in the exercises that follow. As it grows it will reveal to
you more and more about yourself. Or, more accurately, silence
will reveal yourself to you. That is its first revelation: your self
And in and through this revelation you will attain things that
money cannot buy, things like wisdom and serenity and joy and
God.
To attain these priceless things it is not enough for you to
reflect, talk, discuss. What you will need is work. Get to work right
now.

Close your eyes. Seek silence for another five minutes.
At the end of the exercise note whether your attempts this
time are more successful or less.

By the simple expedient of reading too many New Age books aimed at daydreamers, one can deepen one’s habit of daydreaming rather than meditating.

Shocking little passages like: To attain these priceless things it is not enough for you to reflect, talk, discuss. What you will need is work. Get to work right
now.

–tend to break up one’s happy little daydream.

It’s noteworthy that this admonition to a five-minute effort is presented after a ten-minute effort and a two-minute effort. Somehow the pattern of effort and rest stimulates considerably more effort than just one meditation surrounded by theory.

I don’t think I will read through this book quickly. I hope I’ll be able to make it through the book and actually do the exercises even once. But meditation is the kind of thing that can require a lifetime of repeated practice.

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