Women, Feminism, Manga, and Anime (and perhaps a minor spoiler for Space Dandy)

I started some half-hearted research on embittered feminists who hate anime eight months ago.

I never finished the research, but the recent episode of Space Dandy convinced me that today is the proper day for an embittered feminist post.

So the visual might be a minor spoiler…

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dandyscarlet

research issue: how many women involved in anime writing are political feminists?

Feminist anime

Thomas H. Huxley
“Irrationally held truths may be more harmful than reasoned errors.”

http://www.themarysue.com/10-manga-to-read/#0

http://s1e1.com/2012/09/women-and-anime-fanservice-feminism.html

http://okazu.blogspot.com/2004/02/yuri-manga-rica-tte-kanji.html

http://community.feministing.com/2009/11/10/feminist-anime/

http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Anime_Fandom

Controversial Anime
Chobits

Controversial for its portrayal of the main character as a sexualized robot created to look like a 14 year old girl whose only purpose in life is to find a man to love her.
Revolutionary Girl UtenaEdit

Controversial for one of the main plots, in which a group of (mostly) young men fighting for possession of a woman. The anime centers around a girl, Utena, who decides she’s not going to be just another princess and wants to be a prince and do the rescuing herself. In addition to the theme of challenging gender roles, there are also themes about sexual identity, incest, and sexual abuse. Arguably, one of the messages of the anime is that love between women can change the world, which can also be considered controversial.
Seraphim Call

This series of 12 visual short stories addresses a number of themes about women, including career choice, the construction of femininity, and sexuality. However, many of the stories contain problematic elements that aren’t handled especially well, including traditional feminine roles, stalking, and sexualization of the female body.
Vision of Escaflowne

Known as a transitional anime–that is, transitional between the shojo (girl) and shonen (boy) genres–it is frequently compared to Neon Genesis Evangelion. The character development is typical of shojo anime, but the backdrop of war, battles, and giant mecha is clearly drawn from shonen anime. Escaflowne flouts tradition by having a central female character who is strong, outgoing, and full of agency. Unfortunately, the series ends with a plot twist that retroactively removes all agency from the main character, Hitomi, throughout the story and actually makes her use of agency the cause of much woe. This ending causes Escaflowne to become extremely problematic for the female viewer.
Positive Anime
Last Exile: Fam The Silver Wing

The second installment of Studio Gonzos Last Exile is featuring woman in every prominent role (except for the series villain) and is written by a women, Kiyoko Yoshimura (the first series only strong woman was the villain and was written by a man).
The Twelve Kingdoms

Supposedly Fushigi Yûgi (teenage girl is the chosen one of a fantasy world) without the misogyny.

Paradise Kiss

Yukari Hayasaka is a high school student who has become tired of her life of constant schooling. She then comes across a group of student fashion designers in need of a model for their “Paradise Kiss” clothing label. Yukari knows nothing about the fashion world and is taken back by the group’s eccentric ways, but she soon comes to admire their free thinking ways and ability to pursue their dreams with a one track mind.

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