Pupipo~!

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I normally hate to recommend particular anime series, because most of them are 24-minute merchandise commercials, and I would hate for someone to come to me and say, “Look, I watched 12 episodes of that on your advice, and now I demand that you give me those 288 minutes of my life back.” (And I have made some terrible recommendations in the past. When <a href=”http://myanimelist.net/anime/56/Avenger”>Avenger</a&gt; first came out, I was convinced that it would be the most awesome show ever, and I told all my otaku buddies to watch it. As is too often the case, the first episode promised much more than the story could ever deliver. After a few mediocre episodes, it ran out of good ideas and flailed around purposelessly until its time was up.)

In the case of <em>Pupipo~! </em>however, it seems that the author takes a fairly well-informed approach to paranormal issues and delivers a coherent story within a time limit of 4 minutes per episode. So you could watch six plot-packed episodes of this in the time it would normally take you to watch a single episode of slickly-produced-but-story-poor giant-robots-and-fan-service.

I have high hopes that <em>Pupipo~!</em> will turn out to be a <a href=”http://vultureofcritique.wordpress.com/scholarship/quotations/g-k-chesterton-on-the-novel-with-a-purpose/”>story with a purpose</a>. Empirical evidence suggests that <a href=”http://vultureofcritique.wordpress.com/obvious-observations/stories-that-change-behavior/”>all stories tend to change their audiences’ behaviors</a>. If I can find stories that elevate the overall level of anime from fan service to philosophy, I should do what little I can to promote them.

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