Tag Archives: garo

Tsundere MILF is a Mary Sue for middle-aged women

The first Garo story was about a father and a son.

This one is effectively about an adoptive mother and a son, but in fact she might turn out to be his birth mother by the end of the series.

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The condescension that this woman shows for the young man is unbearable. I get enough exposure to female-to-male contempt from real life. I am not eager to see it in my leisure time viewing.

Despite her impractical, stripperific armor, she can bust out of prison just like a male hero.

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The villains are slightly more sympathetic than the heroes.

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The basic problem with this show is that the writers are way, way, way over their heads in love with the female protagonist.

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Yeah, yeah, I understand, fellows. This character is your goddess. This is your ideal anima-figure. This is the female symbol that embodies all that you find desirable in existence.

Fine. Leave me out of it. I’m going to drop this mess and watch something with inoffensive characters.


“Your face oozes with indecency.” I’ll have to remember that remark for the next time I get into a forum-based flame war.

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Garo the standard theme: learning the TRUE meaning of “to protect”

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Sometimes when we talk about sappy writing, we summarize stereotypes by saying, “He learns the TRUE meaning of FRIENDSHIP.” We mean to say that the story is using themes that are suitable for small children; we imply that we have seen these stereotypes a million times before and we’re getting pretty bored.

Garo has this problem, a bit, but somehow it’s still fairly charming. The protagonist is learning the TRUE meaning of “to protect.” In theory, fictional action heroes are always supposed to be protecting something. In practice, action fiction sells because it stimulates our primal need for violence. There’s no need to pretend that we know about ethics or hard decisions, unless we are TV producers selling a stupid show to the parents of our target audience of six-year-old consumers.

A good fiction writer is just a competent propagandist. The fact that he’s good at propagandizing suckers doesn’t mean that he uses his skills for the truth. Even if he wants to tell the truth, he probably doesn’t know what the truth is.