Shikabane Hime

<a href=”http://vultureofcritique.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/shikabane-hime-large.jpg”><img class=”alignnone size-full wp-image-2671″ src=”http://vultureofcritique.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/shikabane-hime-large.jpg&#8221; alt=”shikabane-hime-large” width=”605″ height=”819″ /></a>
<a href=”http://myanimelist.net/anime/4581/Shikabane_Hime:_Aka”>http://myanimelist.net/anime/4581/Shikabane_Hime:_Aka</a&gt;

is a fairly strong series.

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The Action Girl can get into serious combat because she can’t be killed by normal means – she’s undead. She’s superhuman, but not especially strong, so she has to fight with weapons. It’s a somewhat gloomy series, because she doesn’t want to die, and she doesn’t want to be undead, and she doesn’t even enjoy fighting a whole lot – she would rather have had a normal life and a normal death.

<a href=”http://myanimelist.net/anime/5034/Shikabane_Hime:_Kuro”&gt;
http://myanimelist.net/anime/5034/Shikabane_Hime:_Kuro</a&gt;

wraps up most of the major questions, but leaves a big space so that the writers can do a final story if the get funding.

Damn it, Japan.

All I ask for is a story that is coherent and complete within itself. If you keep making stories with more room to grow, you get the ideology of the cancerous tumor that always wants to grow and never acknowledges its limits. Shikabane Hime did an excellent job of committing to its characters and its setting. The writers are obviously capable of committing to the plot. The producers should give the writers an opportunity to make that commitment.